Pat Nelson

Laugh Until You Pee

Dahlynn and Ken McKowen of Publishing Syndicate launched their Laugh Until You Pee blog in October. The McKowens post humorous stories from their Not Your Mother's Book anthology series. For lots of laughs, sign up today at www.LaughUntilYouPee.com. You'll see why you should purchase all the books in the series! Available at www.PublishingSyndicate.com and from your favorite online bookseller.

Family Newsletter for Disabled Boy Includes My Column

Each year, the family of A. J. Patnode sends out a newsletter about their teenage boy who has been severely disabled since birth. This year's newsletter featured unique photography by A.J.'s father Mike Patnode and the way A.J. helped create the beautiful artwork. The family also included a copy of my The Valley Bugler column about Mike Patode's art.

Workshop: Writing for Anthologies by Pat Nelson

The Pacific Northwest Gift Gallery in Castle Rock, Wash., is offering writing workshops with Pat Nelson, Mary Ellen Stone and Carolyn Caines. Topics include "Writing for Anthologies" (Nelson), Crafting Dynamic Dialogue (Stone) and Journaling/Writing Memoirs (Caines). Cost is $15 per class and advaned registration is required. Nelson's workshop on anthologies will be held November 15 from 11 A.M. - 1 P.M.

The Gift Gallery at 1316 A Mount St. Helens Way N.E. Castle Rock, Wash., features the talent of 66 local artists, artisans and authors. For info call 360 274-8583.

Radio Interview to Promote Your Book

Radio interview? Me? I've never given one before. That was my initial response when I was offered a morning drive-time radio interview on the book I co-created, Not Your Mother's Book . . . On Being a Parent."   

As soon as those words flashed through my mind, I thought, Wow! What a great opportunity! I am a lucky girl!

Visiting the Talk Story Bookstore on Kauai

My books go everywhere with me now. You never know when you will have an opportunity to sell books or to introduce your books to someone who doesn't know about them.

Open Window

In the early years of sanatoriums, tubercular mothers, fathers, children, grandparents…both the rich and the poor… were sent away to fresh-air sanatoriums where they slept by open windows, sometimes waking to snow and ice on their thick covering of blankets, with frozen water in their glasses and frozen urine in their pots.
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